Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Pacific Symposium 2019 in Tokoroa, NZ.



Last month we presented "Identity in a Global World" at the Pacific Symposium 2019 in Tokoroa, NZ. You will find a summary of our key ideas below: 
    
Key themes:

Identity 
C6  The service curriculum respects and supports the right of each child to be confident in their own culture and encourages children to understand and respect other cultures.

Global citizenship
C6  The service curriculum respects and supports the right of each child to be confident in their own culture and encourages children to understand and respect other cultures.

Unconscious bias
C3  Adults providing education and care engage in meaningful, positive interactions to enhance children’s learning and nurture reciprocal relationships.

Aspirations of whānau
C11  Positive steps are taken to respect and acknowledge the aspirations held by parents and whnau for their children. 

Identity:
Our current system of lumping students into ‘Pasifika learners” has to stop. Our children come with so much rich cultural capital that can be completely disregarded if we focus on placing them into the kete of ‘Pasifika & Maori learners.

What’s important when talking about ‘identity’ is not how we categorise our students, but how they see themselves.

Reflection:
What is the story of your name?
How do you nurture identity in your environment?
If we want our tamariki to prioritise identity, it starts with YOU! What is your identity?


Global Citizenship:

“One Size does not fit all” - Refrain from putting our children into a Pasifika Learners basket.
Global citizenship is the idea that all people have rights and civic responsibilities that come with being a member of the world, with whole-world philosophy and sensibilities, rather than as a citizen of a particular nation or place.

The ability to walk in different worlds with confidence. 

Reflection:
Which worlds/spaces can you operate in confidently?

Unconscious bias:
Examples
  • Assuming an older person walking with a young child is the child’s grandparent
  • The belief that men will not have care-giving responsibilities
  • Expecting lower achievement from Māori/Pacific Nations students
  • Assuming a female applicant with young children will take more time off work than a male applicant



Once we know that biases are not always explicit, we are responsible for them. We all need to recognise and acknowledge our biases and find ways to mitigate their impact on our behaviour and decisions. - Equality Challenge Unit UK: Unconscious Bias in Higher Education Review 2013.

Aspirations of whānau
Ask whānau, what do you dream for your child? Record their answers and then ask yourself - So what? What am I going to do about this?

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