03 May 2021

What is the purpose of school? Guy Claxton and Kath Murdoch


Kath asked Guy the following question: What is the purpose of school in 2021?
School should be a well-designed set of gears, and the most important gear is the purpose.
We are supporting parents in preparing students for life. So, what do students need to know, to do, and to be like to flourish now and in the future?
Education has multiple components in terms of knowledge, competence and character.

What do we think ALL of our kids are likely to need to flourish? 



A learning framework

Dispositions underpin success in life more - curiosity, determination, are like a big fish at the bottom of the river. Keep an eye on the bottom of the river.  Look at the whole of what's going on.



23 March 2021

Writing introductions and conclusions - AUT Workshop

Introduction

Move 1: State research field
Move 2: Establish niche
Move 3: Occupy niche


My attempt at rewriting the introduction:
A central issue in educational leadership is communication. Communication is regarded as an essential leadership skill. Relatively few studies focus on listening as a key communication skill. The objective of this study is to examine the ways in which listening improves the leadership practice of Cook Island leaders in New Zealand primary schools.

Conclusion

Move 1: Summarise findings
Move 2: Identify implications
Move 3: Suggest further research



02 March 2021

Academic Writing - AUT Workshop

This evening, I participated in the Academic Writing - AUT workshop. I've been studying at the tertiary level for 25 years and have been told on many occasions that I am a good writer. For the most part, I enjoy writing and find it easy to discuss dialogue, debate topics - I think this is because I am a really good talker (I talk lots!). However, in my recent task for MEdLead thesis I found it incredibly difficult to keep to my wordcount (wrote too much) and found it challenging getting to the point (the longest sentences you ever did meet!). Hence, after 25 years of studying, I decided to go back to the basics.

I really enjoyed the workshop and appreciated that part of why I. need to work on is planning out what I am going to say, before actually putting pen to paper. I enjoyed this so much, I'm heading back for the reading workshop next week.






 


19 February 2021

Writing Literature review sections - AUT workshop

 


What have been the important ideas? 
  • Many definitions/types of listening
  • There is limited literature on listening in education
  • So many aspects - listening, leadership, communication, Cook Island leaders.
What is important to know?
As few researchers have addressed listening as a leadership skill, this theses aims to examine the ways in which listening can improve the leadership practice of Cook Island leaders in New Zealand primary schools.

What is your research topic?
Improving leadership practice through ‘listening’: The perspective of Cook Island leaders in New Zealand primary schools.

What is your research needed, relevant and important?
We understand communication to be an important leadership skill, however, this generally means we believe that leaders must articulate ideas clearly. This research aims to unpack the role of listening as a key communication skill and listen to the perspective of Cook Island leaders.


There was a brilliant resource shared, http://www.phrasebank.manchester.ac.uk/ that I know will be useful for my upcoming writing of my theses chapters.


We need to paraphrase literature in our own words without changing the meaning!

16 February 2021

Getting started with writing - AUT workshop

 

TIPS AND TRICKS FREE WRITING
  • Use a prompt
  • Take 5-7 minutes for the free writing warm-up
  • The pen does not leave paper, fingers do not leave the keyboard
  • Keep asking yourself "What else is there?", "What else is there?" and keep going.
  • Write about your blank and often a thought comes to mind
  • Identify concepts and examples (We wrote about how social media can be used as learning tool in universities in my free-writing I wrote e.g. platforms - instagram, tiktok, facebook and twitter)
  • Listing concepts in free writing
  • Group ideas/concepts



06 October 2020

Research Quality


‘Quality’ has been a tertiary education policy buzzword under both National and Labour governments over the last decade in New Zealand (see, for example, Ministry of Education 2006, 2009), but appeals to this much overused and often ill-defined notion mask deeper changes at work in the reconfiguration of research and researchers. These have been felt especially keenly in Education, where, one-by-one, all of the former stand-alone teachers’ colleges in New Zealand have been amalgamated with universities. The first such amalgamation occurred in the early 1990s and the last in the second half of the first decade of the 21st century. This has been, in part, a shift from a strong practitioner culture to an environment where research is expected to be an integral part of the job. 

Roberts, P. (2013). Reconfiguring research in New Zealand: education, politics and performativity. The Australian Educational Researcher, 40(4), 509-512. doi:10.1007/s13384-013-0108-x

29 September 2020

Critical analysis - taking stock of my progress.



My research design (so far):

Research aim:
The purpose of the proposed research is to better understand leaders experiences of listening to others and how this influences their leadership practice.

Research question:
How can we better understand listening as a leadership skill from the perspectives of Cook Island leaders in New Zealand primary schools?

Conceptual framework:
I will be using the Turanga Framework to critically examine the position of the Cook Island leaders in the context of their space.

The three elements of the framework are: (1) Akono’anga Māori, Cook Islands culture; (2) No teia tuatau, of this time; and (3) Tā’anga’anga’ia, put to practice.

(1) Akono’anga Māori, Cook Islands culture; - (What?)
Turanga - position, place and status
Pirianga - to close, hold tight, to work, relationships
Akaueanga - the duties of care
Ngakau aro’a - willingness and conviction of the heart

(2) No teia tuatau, of this time - (So what?)
Significant and relevant
 (i) komakoma marie, let our conversation be unhurried, be in the now; and (ii) kia maru to korua komakoma’anga, let your conversations be calm and measured.

(3) Tā’anga’anga’ia, put to practice - (Now what?)
Transformation occurs when akono’anga Māori, being relevant to the time and environment, are put into practice. On their own they are simply cultural concepts, isolated in space and without purpose. Turanga Māori is one conceptual framework. Irrespective of the model or framework a practitioner chooses, the model or framework is but a tool to inform and guide practice. Turanga Māori’s purpose is to be relevant and effective for Cook Islands Maori client(s) and practitioners. That practice should be informed by the culture of the people we serve.

Suggestions for Narrative Inquiry on Seidman (1998) adapted using the Turanga Framework
Pirianga process (Introduce myself, make connections, introduce the research and the Turanga Framework to participants, leave an information sheet and 
First interview - life history (Introduce the Turanga Framework to participants discuss where they see themselves in relation to Turanga, Pirianga, Akaueanga and Ngakau Aro'a) set the scene for second and third interview 
Second interview - No teia tuatau, of this time - discuss concrete experiences of listening (using 15 images of Cook Islands artefacts as a metaphor provocation).
Third interview - No teia tuatau, of this time - discuss concrete experiences of listening (using 15 images of Cook Islands artefacts as a metaphor provocation).
Third interview - reflect on their understandings and researchers Tā’anga’anga’ia, put to practice. Share what they have noticed about their listening, final reflections and any change to practice.

Elliott, J. (2012). Gathering narrative data. In S. Delamont (Ed.), Handbook of Qualitative Research in Education (pp. 281–298). Edward Elgar Publishing Limited. http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/aut/detail.action?docID=866984

Seidman, I. (1998), Interviewing as Qualitative Research, New York: Teachers College Press


Methods:
Three to four Cook Island leaders in NZ Primary schools will be invited to participate in this project. I will meet with each participant 3 times over a span of 2 months and collect their narratives using the Turanga framework as our 

Overarching question: How do Cook Island leaders in New Zealand Primary schools understand listening as a leadership skill?

Patai korero:
Elliot (2012) offers a word of advice in this respect "Chase, therefore, concludes that we are most
likely to succeed in eliciting narratives from our research subjects when we ask simple questions that clearly relate to their life experiences" and they argue that "the best questions for narrative interviews invite the interviewee to talk about specific times and situations, rather than asking about the respondent’s life over a long period of time"..."In addition to asking appropriate questions, the interviewer who wants to encourage the production of narratives during an interview must clearly also be a good listener

Initial questions:
"Can you think of someone in your life who is/was a great listener? Tell me about them".
"What are your thoughts on listening as a leadership skill?"
"From these 15 images here, Tell me which best aligns with your listening identity"

Emerging questions:
Can you think of a significant or relevant listening episode in the past two weeks, tell me about it?
Which of these images best describe the way you were listening? tell me more.

How long can the narratives go for? In addition to asking appropriate questions, the interviewer who wants to encourage the production of narratives during an interview must clearly also be a good listener (Elliot, 2012, p. 287) what is important is to make the timing clear to the interviewee from the start...I suggested to interviewees that the interview would probably last for approximately an hour and a half, but might go on as long as two hours (Elliot, 2012, p. 287)

Elliott, J. (2012). Gathering narrative data. In S. Delamont (Ed.), Handbook of Qualitative Research in Education (pp. 281–298). Edward Elgar Publishing Limited. http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/aut/detail.action?docID=866984

Seidman, I. (1998), Interviewing as Qualitative Research, New York: Teachers College Press